Keeping romance alive and kicking at any age

“Romance is the glamor which turns the dust of everyday life into a golden haze,” said Carolyn Gold Heilbrun.

While it takes a little extra effort, romance can make for a healthier, happier and more fulfilling relationship. Every couple’s love goes through phases, and many couples find romance starts to fade as they grow older. If you and your love are in this situation, whether you’ve forgotten how to connect or are stuck in the same routine, try some of the tips below to add a little spice to your love life.

The basics

Get back to the basics. As an experienced couple, you know what makes your love tick. This could be surprise kisses, breakfast in bed, watching the sunset together, or enjoying old movies. Try to think back to the little things that made your relationship exciting over the years. Even holding hands or taking the time to express specific things you love about them can make a big difference in your relationship. Sometimes the most romantic things you can do are giving simple reminders and signals that they’re on your mind, and you know them better than anyone else.

Walk together

Quality time is a must when it comes to romance. Walking is the perfect way to spend quality time, have meaningful conversations, and even do some of that hand-holding! You’ll have the opportunity to reconnect, get some exercise and fresh air, and take a break from your usual routine.

Photo shoot

Over the years, you’ve probably taken many family photos with kids, grandkids and a wide range of color-coordinated outfits. Try doing a photo shoot of just the two of you. Dress up in your favorite clothes, drive to your favorite place around town or in nature, and have your photos professionally taken. Not only will this be a fun way to spend time together, but also gives you romantic photographs to hang up around your home. Not to mention that during the photo shoot you’ll be reminded how her eyes sparkle or how his smile makes your heart skip a beat.

Road trip

A road trip could be the trick you need to rekindle your romance. Try adding a little excitement by making the destination unknown or researching a bed and breakfast to spend the night at. You’ll have time to talk and a little adventure is sure to jumpstart romance.

Scavenger hunt

This romantic idea is a fun twist on a road trip. Map out all the places that are significant to your relationship. This could be favorite restaurants, places you love to walk, or locations of good memories. You can design it as a scavenger hunt with the final location a place neither of you has been. By the end of the day, you’ll both be reminded of the history that’s made your relationships strong. It’s a big gesture that the two of you can enjoy together.

Intimacy

Some couples struggle with intimacy as they grow older. A healthier sex life between you and your partner could be the key to your romance struggles. If your relationship is lacking in this department, consider planning a weekend getaway, or even simply lighting some candles and setting the mood. Intimacy is essential to connecting as a couple and can often be a romantic experience for both parties.

New hobbies

Learning something new is a great way to bond and make memories with your loved one. Take up golfing or something artsy. The two of you will have something new in common and be sharing meaningful time with each other. Experiences like this can help shake up the routine and reignite the romance.

Love language

Sometimes the best way to increase romance is to learn how you and your love want to be loved. One of my favorite books is “The 5 Love Languages.” The book outlines the five possible ways most people want to receive and give love. Understanding how your partner wants to be loved, whether it’s through acts of service or words of affirmation, will help you connect and love on a deeper level.

It’s never too late to turn up the heat on your love life. Try out some of these tips, and the two of you will have more romance than ever before.

This article was originally published by The Daily Herald. It has been republished here with permission.

Seniors and dental care: it’s something worth smiling about

Typically, we make sure our family has regular checkups but is your older loved one following the same schedule? Experts are guessing the answer is probably not.

According to the Center for Disease Control, a little over half (60 percent) of today’s senior adults visited a dentist in 2013 despite the fact that one in four of seniors aged 65 and older have gum disease. This segment of the population is in need of proper dental care since many of today’s serious diseases can be linked to tooth decay or gum disease.

“It is thought that poor dental hygiene allows a proinflammatory state that is associated with CAD,” wrote Youngsoo Cho, MD., “I must emphasize that this is not a proven cause, but studies have shown an association with tooth decay and Coronary Artery Disease.”

Other studies have found correlations between poor oral hygiene and diabetes and pneumonia.

Yes, Aunt Cora needs to visit the dentist, but there are a number of challenges seniors face when it comes to dental care. Three of those reasons include financial, transportation and lack of prevention.

Put your money where your mouth is

“Unfortunately, only about 2 percent of older Americans have dental insurance,” wrote contributor Chris Hawkins for SeniorLiving.com. “This means that many end up going without. And the older the person, the more likely they are to need dental care for a variety of reasons.”

At present, neither Obamacare nor Medicare provides dental coverage. However, there are programs at a state level that can offset the cost of dental care.

Running your mouth off

Oftentimes, it is the responsibility of a loved one to transport a senior to various medical appointments. If that kind of support doesn’t exist, the condition of his or her mouth will decline.

The good news is that many senior facilities are proactively taking the matter of dental care into their hands.

“It’s really hard to find good dental benefits for seniors. Medicaid does cover some but it’s limited in most states. However in a long-term care facility like Provo Rehab and Nursing, there is an internal dentist that makes sure residents have routine cleanings and checkups,” said Loralee Hatch, business director at Provo Rehab and Nursing.

Here’s something to chew on

As with most health conditions, prevention is the best defense against serious disease, and dental care is no exception. It is common for many of your loved ones’ medications to create dry mouth, which encourages tooth decay and disease. Also, treatments requiring chemotherapy or radiation to the head or neck can damage or destroy oral tissue.

Seniors can counteract the potential damage of medications or treatments by drinking lots of fluids, avoiding tobacco and alcohol, and adopting a routine of regular brushing and flossing. In some cases, it is difficult for your loved one to brush their own teeth. In situations of dementia or other medical limitations, seniors may not cooperate. The best strategy is to talk with your loved one’s doctor and discuss your dental concerns with the skilled nursing or assisted living facility. You will find that everyone involved wants the best for your senior and will work together to be sure your senior’s dental needs are addressed.

“Keeping your mouth healthy keeps your overall system in shape, especially in your senior years,” said Hatch, and that’s worth smiling about.

This article was originally published by The Daily Herald. It has been republished here with permission.

25 Family history questions to ask Grandpa before it’s too late

When a loved one passes away, it’s not just their presence you miss. Along with their smile, their kindness, generosity and voice, the individual stories and memories that make up that individual are lost as well. With all the ways that currently exist to ask questions and record and preserve memories, don’t wait until it’s too late to record the important information your grandfather has to share.

A study found that “the more children knew about their family’s history, the stronger their sense of control over their lives, the higher their self-esteem and the more successfully they believed their families functioned.”

To get the best information, and maybe even some new stories you’ve never heard, you will find the more specific the questions, the better.

Here is a list of questions to ask your grandpa the next time you visit.

Questions about Childhood

Little details about the past and how children played are a piece of history. With the changing generations, technology, and other factors, you might find your grandfather had a completely different childhood than you. Then again, some things never change.

1. What games were popular when you were a kid?

2. Tell me about your best friend growing up? Have you kept in touch? What was special about this person?

3. Do you remember any particular sadness in your growing up years? Were there any tragedies or events that shaped you?

4. What types of things did you do as a kid that kids of the newer generation don’t do anymore (paper route, etc.)?

5. What is the fondest memory you have of your mother and father? Grandfathers and grandmothers?

Jobs and hobbies

Information about your grandpa’s career, jobs, and hobbies can give you an idea of how they spent their time. But, if you find that they are lonely or feeling bored, knowing what activities they found joy in can give you ideas for activities you participate in with them today.

6. What was your first job? What did you like about it? What did you hate about it? Any stories from that job that stand out to you?

7. Did you go to college? What did you study? Did you graduate? Any stories about college friends, professors, or trips?

8. What hobbies have you had that brought you joy? Did you collect anything (stamps, rocks, coins, etc.)?

9. Did you enjoy reading, writing, or creating art? What was the first book you can remember loving?

10. As a child, what were your career aspirations? Did those change as you got older? Why?

Family and friends

11. Have you asked your parents or grandparents how they met or what their courtship was like? Stories and memories of dating can inspire sweet and funny memories.

“From the day my grandparents met, and throughout their entire courtship, my grandfather wrote a letter to my grandma expressing his love for her,” said Kellyn Brandt, administrative assistant at Sea Cliff Healthcare Center. “It wasn’t until my grandfather passed that I learned about this, and it made me think about all the questions I could have asked him. Since then I’ve been hounding my grandmother for every detail about their love life.”

12. (If married) How did you and your spouse meet? What were your other dating experiences like? How did you know your spouse was the one to marry?

13. As an adult, did you have any close friends who you’ve kept in touch with? Think about the friends who influenced your life and why they were important to you.

14. Name one thing about each of your kids (if you have them) that stuck out to you as they were growing up.

15. Name something about raising children that changed from your first child to your last.

Places you’ve lived

While your grandfather may have lived his life in the same home as his parents, there may be details you didn’t know or expect. Learn about their travels and experiences both at home and away.

16. What do you remember about your childhood home? Where did you grow up, and where do you consider your hometown?

17. Did you ever move? What were your feelings when you moved? How many different places did you live?

18. Name each place you lived and one memory of each place that shaped your life?

19. Of all the places you’ve lived, which was your favorite? Which was the saddest?

20. Where would you have liked to live but never got there?

Looking forward

21. How do you want your family and friends to remember you? Of all the ways people could describe you, what words or thoughts would you like to leave with them?

22. What are you most proud of in your life? Any relationship or professional achievements?

23. How has your faith or spirituality changed throughout your life? Where did you start, and where are you now?

24. Was there any experience or event in your life that you didn’t think you would make it through? How did you persevere, and what did that experience teach you?

25. What was the kindest thing you’ve done for someone else?

Speaking with your loved ones about their lives is a way to record the pieces of your family history that live only with them. Beyond the record that these conversations create, talking to your grandpa will strengthen a relationship with him now, and you’ll have plenty of stories to share with your children. And that’s enough reason to pick up the phone or drive over and connect now.

This article was originally published on Familyshare.com. it has been republished here with permission. 

5 reasons walking every day will change your life

What makes you feel good, look good, and only requires a pair of tennis shoes? Walking. We know exercise is important for a healthy lifestyle, but finding motivation to get active before or after a long day can be tough. This is why walking is a great option. It may be a less intense form of exercise, but walking offers so many health benefits, from improved mental health to chronic disease prevention. Read on to see why taking a few minutes out of your day to walk could be the best thing for your body.

Improved mental health

Whether you walk outside in the fresh air or on a treadmill while listening to your favorite tunes, walking is proven to improve mental health. A study from the Journal of Psychiatric Research found that people suffering from depression who regularly walked 30-45 minutes for three months showed signs of improvement when their medication didn’t cure their symptoms. Walking can give you energy, decrease anxiety and stress, improve your ability to focus, and give you a break from your to-do list.

Healthier heart

Walking has been shown to improve cholesterol and blood pressure levels, as well as prevent diabetes—all of which can contribute to heart disease and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends walking at a brisk pace for at least thirty minutes each day to receive these heart benefits. If you’re not quite in shape enough to do this, the American Heart Association suggests setting a fitness goal for walking a few minutes at a time and increasing this time as you get more in shape.

Prevent dementia

Dementia is a growing concern among adults, but exercise is one of the best and proven ways to prevent it. According to a review of Archives of Medical Research, exercising regularly can decrease your chances of dementia by 50 percent. Walking not only helps your current health but can also keep disorders like dementia under at bay.

Improved bones and muscles

Walking also helps strengthen your bones and decrease arthritis symptoms. It can reduce fractures and symptoms of osteoporosis by preventing the loss of bone mass. Muscles and joints also benefit from walking, as the movement helps distribute pressure and nutrients for a healthier range of motion and increased strength.

“Walking is one of the best aerobic activities a senior can do,” said Mark Walker, director of therapy at Orem Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing. “We encourage everybody to do at least 20 to 30 minutes of walking activities per day. Walk to the mailbox, walk down the aisles of the grocery store, or go to the rec center. Walking would be a great addition to a daily routine.”

Weight loss

Maintain a healthy weight by walking regularly. It’s a great way to burn extra calories and lose weight over time. Due to it being a low-intensity and social exercise, you’re more likely to be consistent with making time for it versus other more extreme workouts.

So, whether it’s your heart or your mind that you’re looking to strengthen, consider taking a daily walk. Your body will be thanking you for years to come.

This article was originally published by Orange County Register. It has been republished here with permission.

3 things you should know about diabetes

Did you know at this very moment you could have diabetes?

In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control, out of the 29 million Americans with diabetes, 1 in 4 don’t know they have the disease. But as thousands of new cases of diabetes are diagnosed each year, the prognosis is grim. A newly diagnosed diabetic faces a future of pills, vague fitness and nutrition plans and no real answers for effective treatment.

What if the medical community could eliminate diabetes from our families? What if there was a way to prevent diabetes? Better yet, what if there was a way to reverse it?

There is a way.

But it requires a greater understanding of the effects of diabetes on the body, the limitations of today’s healthcare and the empowering effects of looking at this disease differently.

The effects of diabetes on the body

What is happening in your body? Quite a bit. In a healthy body, energy is created when the hormone insulin pulls glucose cells out of the blood and passes through a receptor site to produce Adenosine Triphosphate or ATP.

But in a diabetic’s body, the receptor site doesn’t open for this molecule, so insulin and blood sugar have no choice but to convert to cholesterol, attach to your blood vessel walls and wreak havoc on your system with painful inflammation.

Today’s pharmaceutical companies have created drugs for every health condition. Often a diabetic is prescribed a cocktail of blood sugar, cholesterol, and high blood pressure medications and told to eat right and exercise, yet this generalized treatment plan doesn’t effectively reduce the symptoms of this disease.

The limitations of today’s healthcare system

At times it seems there is a disconnect between treating and curing disease. One pathway doesn’t typically lead to the other. It’s frustrating.

According to the World Health Organization, the US ranks 37 in overall health systems, barely edging out Slovenia and Cuba. Americans take 50% of the world’s medications yet make up a mere 5% of the world’s population. Our nation’s dependency on pharmaceuticals contributes to a healthcare system that focuses on symptoms rather than prevention. That can be frustrating for a patient struggling for answers.

The empowering effects of looking at diabetes differently

“Get busy living, or get busy dying.” —Andy Dufrensne, character from the movie “The Shawshank Redemption”

You have the power to reverse this disease, and there are tools to help you. This isn’t about turning your back on modern medicine. I recognize the use of drugs as an essential part of treatment for a number of illnesses, but I don’t view medications as a permanent solution.

A better approach would be for patients to free themselves from the confines of large quantities of medications and explore long-term solutions through customized treatment plans that profoundly improve quality of life.

If you hope to control diabetes, you must gain a greater understanding of this disease, understand the limitations of the present healthcare system and embrace a new knowledge of what can treat and ultimately reduce the negative effects of this disease. In this way, you are gonna “get busy living” every day.

Dr. Candice Hall is Chief of Staff of Next Advanced Medicine. She was awarded Physician of the Year in 2005 from the NRCC and has over 14 years of experience in Functional Medicine.

This article was originally published on Familyshare.com. It has been republished here with permission.

Things Patients Should Never Do

When help is needed, who do you call?

Your mom? Maybe you pose your question in a Facebook post or tweet? In this fast-paced, ever-changing world, it’s nice to know there are people you can rely on when you need help and guidance.

“A family medicine doctor is one who does a little bit of everything,” explained Dr. Scott Peterson, who practices family medicine along with his physician father, Dr. David Peterson and fellow physician Dr. Thomas Carn at the Wasatch Medical Center. “It’s much like your old general practice physicians. I enjoy delivering babies and then watching them grow into adults. I was looking at different branches of medicine and decided I really liked that lifetime continuity of care.”

In its 50 years, Wasatch Medical Center has offered care for as many as four generations of patients in some families.

As an enduring mainstay in the community, Scott Peterson, David Peterson and Carn have learned much about their patients, and they often see behaviors that create concerns. Scott noted three things he would like to see his patients carefully consider.

Don’t choose a doctor based solely on an insurance list

Sadly, some people put more thought into what value meal to order than in selecting a doctor to keep them healthy. Peterson, whose patients call him “Dr. Scott” to distinguish him from his father, urges patients to put careful thought into selecting a physician since patients often just refer to an insurance list to select their doctor.

Yes, it is important to select a physician who accepts your insurance, but you must also consider the caregiving, too. When considering a doctor, ask yourself, “Is this a healthcare provider with whom I would feel comfortable discussing personal matters?” Consider why an insurance company might rate one physician over another; it could be because that provider saves the insurance company money. Also ask questions about recommendations from other patients. It may be that the waiting room time is prolonged because that provider is willing to spend more time with you, listening to your concerns. Is someone disgruntled because their doctor told them something that they did not want to hear?

Every physician has his or her strengths, and Dr. Scott’s concern is that patients research their physician to be sure the doctor is a good fit for the specific needs of the patient and family.

“My best advice is to network and put more stock in the opinions of people who know well and trust rather than the advice of your insurance carrier or a stranger,” Dr. Scott said.

Don’t postpone immunizations

The Internet is full of advice, and much of it sounds very logical. Despite the recent backlash criticizing the merits of immunizing children, Dr. Scott, along with other members of the medical community, work hard to promote the benefits of immunizing children.

According to the Centers of Disease Control, a 2015 study published by CNN.com found that 95 percent of kindergarteners were immunized for preventable diseases, although the state’s percentages vary.

Concerning parents who opt not to immunize, CNN.com reported, “They’re a relatively small group of parents in a big country. But their decision not to vaccinate their children can have a profound impact on public health.”

For Dr. Scott and others, immunization is not a viable debate. It simply comes down to offering protection from preventable diseases for your child and those who share this world with your child.

“The last child I hospitalized for whooping cough was a 2-month-old baby girl,” Dr. Scott said. “That is the age when the immune system is at its weakest point. Although this family was immunized, someone else spread the disease to this little girl who became critically ill.”

Because whooping cough has a long recovery time, this patient was hospitalized on three different occasions.

“It broke my heart to watch them go through this,” Dr. Scott said. “Please, please immunize your children and don’t delay because delays only lead to more risks for your child and others.”

Be careful about self-diagnosis

Dr. Scott has a number of concerns about patients who self-diagnose based on websites and searches.

“I use the Internet to help diagnose patients,” Dr. Scott said. “It is a useful tool, but the Internet isn’t your friend. It hasn’t gone to school, it doesn’t read the studies I read, and it can’t talk with you personally about your unique symptoms.”

With an unprecedented accessibility to online information, it is common for patients to research their own symptoms and form their own conclusions about a possible ailment or disease. Not surprisingly, the concern for a misdiagnosis is all too real.

The dangers are two-fold. For a patient who discovers a serious disease matching her symptoms, she may begin self-treatment for an incorrect health condition, thus causing more damage. On the other hand, a misdiagnosis that minimizes the potential seriousness of a disease can delay lifesaving treatments.

The old adage “you get what you pay for” applies here. Dr. Scott states that many medically sound sites physicians use can be accessed by others for a fee. He recommends Up-To-Date and Epocrates for Physicians as well as the American Academy of Family Medicine. Free resources include the Centers for Disease Control and the Mayo Clinic websites. Patients should keep in mind as they do their research that there are many sites that exist to promote the creators or their products.

“If you spend time researching an idea, then please focus your attention on sites where good science stands behind your source searching,” Dr. Scott said.

No concern is insignificant to family medicine providers such as Dr. Scott, and he urges everyone to seek regular medical checkups and care.

This article was originally published on MomClick. It has been republished here with permission.